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CIRCUMCISION



This is a very intimate subject to discuss, and can bring up intense discussions in families.

Some parents circumcise their baby boys for religious reasons, and many parents choose to do it for reasons of hygiene or because the boy's father is circumcised. But it is not generally recommended as a routine procedure.[1] The medical reasons that used to support circumcision such as accumulation of smegma under the foreskin and risk of urinary tract infections have now been disproved, and both problems are easily solved with simple washing habits.[2] And the idea seems strange that a child would have difficulty coping with looking different from his father, especially since so many more obvious things such as body shape, hair colour, or eye colour never seem to pose any problems. My thought is that avoiding the pain and shock of circumcision is better for the overall wellbeing of the baby and keeping the senses protected.[3]


  "I feel that there is no solid medical evidence at this time to support routine circumcision. The choice is best left up to the parents. Some opt for circumcision for religious reasons, family, or cultural reasons. In other cases, I recommend leaving the foreskin the way nature meant it to be. "

Benjamin Spock, M.D. [4]


St. Joseph with the Jesus child 


by Reni Guido


See How to make decisions



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[1] Neonatal circumcision revisited. Fetus and Newborn Committee, Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS), February 2009, researched August 2009 <http://www.cps.ca/english/statements/FN/fn96-01.htm#Fetus%20and%20Newborn%20Cmtt>


 


[2] Spock, Benjamin, MD and Steven Parker, M.D..  Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care. The Penguin Group, New York 1998


 


[3] Panksepp, Jaak. The long-term psychobiological consequences of infant emotions: Prescriptions for the twenty-first century. Wiley InterScience, Infant Mental Health Journal Volume 22 Issue 1-2, Pages 132 - 173, 25 Jan 2001, researched August 2009 <http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/76509608/abstract>


[4] Spock, Benjamin, MD and Steven Parker, M.D..  Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care. The Penguin Group, New York 1998